Tag Archives: team

3050 Session Seven: Project One Wrap-up and Teamwork 9-18-14

On Tap Today:


Hey you! Yeah, you! The team member that got “yanked”! You may be interested in this…

Vader not impressed

As we discussed, every one of these submissions could be improved.  Wikipedia submission or citation issues, formatting (links, graphics), and content issues can all be fixed. So, for a chance to redeem yourselves in my eyes, and to score a few bonus points (enough to significantly alter your final grade on the project, and perhaps the class) perform some sort of correction by 11:59 pm Thursday, 9/25. If you suspect that you may be the team member that was “yanked” (lost a point due to the evaluations of your peers) you may want to seriously consider this offer.

Teamwork Talk

As you may have discovered, there are multiple ways of working well (or not) together.

Three primary models are:

  • The Round Table

https://stablerenglish.files.wordpress.com/2014/09/f6371-37109chb-37110chb-37111chb-38247-instl.jpgPros: Quick sharing of ideas among team members; Real time debate of pros and cons of project.

Cons: Difficult to schedule time to meet; Difficult to control input if there is only one keyboard operator; Can produce conflict that impedes production.

Most effective for brainstorming, task scheduling and progress reporting.

  • Divide-and-Conquer

https://i1.wp.com/www.hermanmiller.com/content/dam/hermanmiller/page_assets/why_digital/articles/modes_of_work/WHY_ModesOfWork_08.jpg

Pros: Assigned task can be completed in the least amount of time.

Cons: Minimal collaboration; Difficult to recover if a task is not completed by a team member; Inconsistencies in tone and style; Replications or gaps in final product

Most effective for small, specific tasks that are part of a larger project.

  • Layered Approach

https://i1.wp.com/www.policyexchange.org.uk/cache/com_zoo/images/competition%20meets%20collaboration%20static%20showcase_eb2a84690e40d7f80b7ee5b6a3c895f8.jpg

Pros: Each member has multiple opportunities to provide input, critique, and revise; More motivation due to ownership of the project; Similar to professional workplace collaboration

Cons: Different roles may create inequalities; Requires thoughtful and careful planning.

Most effective for drafting and revising tasks.

Team Charters:

Before work can truly begin on Project Two (and Six), even before you decide on a research problem, it would be helpful to know how your team will plan to work.  With your group mates, develop a team charter.  Address the following points:

  1. Overall, broad team goals for the project
  2. Measurable, specific team goals
  3. Personal goals
  4. Individual level of commitment to the project
  5. Other factors that might affect the project
  6. Statement of how the team will resolve impasses
  7. Statement of how the team will handle missed deadlines
  8. Statement of what constitutes unacceptable work and how the team will handle this
  9. Decision on “rank-and-yank” (will you only “rank”, only “yank”, or do both?)

Homework:

Read Handout on Team Writing

Project Two Page and Examples

Write: “Apply Your Expertise” #3 on p.  409 by tonight, 9/18 Write a memo (300 words) to your teammates in response to “Apply Your Expertise” #3.  Consider your execution of Project One and suggest three ways your team can improve productivity heading into Projects Two and Six.  Persuasively explain each suggestion.

Team Charter. Memo format from the team to me. Post it on a team blog page and email the link to me. Print and have all team members sign/initial a copy to be retained by me. by Tuesday 9/23

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